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FAQ

FAQ

How did Locked Up RC get started?

The term "Locked Up" refers to a vehicle that has differential lockers installed, thus having maximum traction off road.

Locked Up RC provides an array of quality parts that meet or exceed builder demands and have proven themselves in competition. We only carry parts that our team runs and stands behind because we want to bring you only the best in "Scale Performance Parts".

We strive to bring you the best parts we can and your input is always welcome. So, if you have any questions, thoughts or comments for us, please let us know.

- Locked Up RC Team


A few notes from the owner:
I started in the RC hobby back in 1986 with a gold pan Team Associated RC10 and have loved RC's since.

In 2006, I dove into the local Texas RC crawling scene with my first crawler.
I have since had more than I care to count.

After several successful USRCCA seasons, I started building and modifying scale trucks, AKA "Scalers" and won several local competitions. In 2011 I traveled to Helena, Montana for the MSD Scale Nationals with my heavily modified Axial SCX10. The truck featured several innovation designs that I had refined over time. The competition was fierce and I recall having to sprint while jumping my truck through the final gate to win class 1. I had battled against some of the best drivers out there and came out on top!

After MSD I refined ideas, manufactured parts and opened Locked Up RC at the end of 2011.

Currently we provide fellow crawlers with some of the best items on the planet.
In addition to offering some tried and true parts, parts that I used to become a national champion, we continue to develop new and exciting ideas every day.


Thanks,
Patrick "Locked Up" Norton

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What is the difference between your 8L, SLW & AO8™ wheel types?

We feature 3 types of wheels at Locked Up RC:


8L™ (8 Lug) Mounts to a 12mm wheel hex.

AO8™ (8 Lug) Uses an AO8 axle flange to mount to the axle pin.

SLW (6 Lug) Uses an SLW hex hub to mount to a 12mm wheel hex.

In addition to a different number of lugs, each style also has a different bolt pattern diameter.
This allows for more (or less) wheel face design as you can see form the below example.


With the milled in hex, our 8L wheels are a great choice to replace your stock plastic wheels.
These wheels feature offsets and backspacing similar to stock.
This keeps your scrub radius close to stock while increasing scale appearance and strength.
Because the hex is milled into the wheel there is nothing extra to buy.
8L wheels make use of M2 hardware around the "hub".

Both SLW & AO8™ allow you to modify your effective offset/backspacing.
This is accomplished by purchasing different SLW hubs or AO8™ axle flanges.
This is a great feature if you want a wider stance for stability, but it does add a bit to the cost.

SLW wheels use 4-40 hardware to attach to SLW hex hubs.
AO8™ wheels use M2 hardware to attache to AO8™ axle flanges.


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What finish options do you offer?

We utilize several processes for finishing our parts that we make available to you.
As with any manufactured part, there may be some color and finish thickness variance between batches.



Black Oxide:
Black oxide or blackening is a conversion coating for ferrous materials, stainless steel, copper and copper based alloys, zinc, powdered metals, and silver solder. It is used to add mild corrosion resistance, for appearance and to minimize light reflection. To achieve maximal corrosion resistance the black oxide must be impregnated with oil or wax. One of its advantages over other coatings is its minimal buildup.

We use black oxide for a variety of parts including several varieties of our hardware and chassis parts.


Zinc Plating:

Zinc coatings prevent oxidation of the protected metal by forming a barrier and by acting as a sacrificial anode if this barrier is damaged. Zinc oxide is a fine white dust that does not cause a breakdown of the substrate's surface integrity as it is formed. Indeed, the zinc oxide, if undisturbed, can act as a barrier to further oxidation, in a way similar to the protection afforded to aluminum and stainless steels by their oxide layers.

We use zinc plating on a lot of our hardware and some specialty parts that require a specific appearance.


Color Anodizing:

Hard anodizing is a phrase used to describe an anodizing coating where the need for surface hardness and abrasion resistance is the main criteria. The build up for hard anodizing is much thicker than your standard anodizing. The typical build up of this coating is 0.001î and also 0.001î penetration into the material. The color of the aluminum oxide build up depends greatly on the alloy of the aluminum material. The color can range from a champagne/gold hue to a dark gray.

We use MIL-A-8625 Type III Class 1 and Class 2. on a variety of our aluminum wheels rings and accessories.


Golden Chemical Film coating:

Chemical Film is a chromate conversion coating which may be applied to aluminum parts in order to enhance corrosion protection while still maintaining conductivity (unlike anodizing). Chemical Film is also be used to improve adhesion for future paints and primers. This process may be done in both a clear or a golden finish. A clear finish is near colorless and provides minimal electrical resistance; whereas, the golden finish is much thicker and is mainly used to increase corrosion protection as well as paint adhesion. The typical chemical film coating should provide roughly 168 hours of salt spray per ASTM B 117.

We use MIL-C-5541 Class 1A
on a variety of our aluminum wheels rings and accessories.

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How do you determine backspacing?

We frequently get questions about how to determine offset & backspace for our wheels vs. "whatever wheels you currently have on your vehicle".


This post is our attempt to help you guys figure that out. We will update this post with relevant info and pictures as we build upon it. Your input is always welcome!
***For all of these measurements, we are going to assume you have beadlock rings installed on both the front and back of the wheel and that both rings are the same thickness.
If you don't have a beadlock, that is OK. Just measure form the outermost and innermost edges of the wheel.


Basics
So we are all talking apples to apples here is how we use the terms:
Backspacing: The distance from the wheel mount face (where your wheel hex goes) to the inner most part of the wheel.
Offset: The distance from the wheel mount face to the center line of the wheel.
Positive Offset: When the wheel mount face is closer to the outer bead on the wheel
Zero Offset: When the wheel mount face is even with the center line of the wheel
Negative Offset: When the wheel mount face is closer to the inner bead on the wheel
Comparison Number: This is a term/calculation we use to help determine your offset change when switching between wheel types.
Click the image to open in full size.

For each wheel type we will help you calculate your backspacing, width, offset and your Comparison Number.

How to measure a standard hex wheel (LURC 8L, Axial SCX10, etc)
To figure out your offset, our formula (yes, math outside of school .... we know) is:
Offset = B - (W/2)
B= Backspacing
W= Width
Start by pulling a backspace measurement like we do for our 8L wheels:
Click the image to open in full size.

Call that measurement "B" and for our example lets say it's B=18mm.

Now measure the entire width of the wheel (with the rings).
Call that "W" and for our example W=30mm.

So we have Offset = 18 - (30/2)
Or 18 - (15) = 3
So the example wheel has a positive offset of 3
(Yours could be negative)

For an 8L wheel your offset equals your comparison number so it's easy!



How to measure a Vanquish SLW style wheel
To figure out your offset, our formula again is:
Offset = B - (W/2)
B= Backspacing
W= Width

So, pull a backspace measurement like we do for our SLW style wheels:
Click the image to open in full size.

Call that measurement "B" and for example lets say B=14.75mm.

Now measure the entire width of the wheel (with the rings).
Call that "W" and for this example W=34mm.

That makes your formula look like this:
Offset = B - (W/2)
Offset = 14.75 - (34/2)
Offset = -2.25

To get a Comparison Number you need:
CN= O - HM

O is offset
HM is Hub Measurement .

The VP .225 has about 2.15mm of meat between where your wheel hex touches the hub and where the hub touches the wheel face:
Click the image to open in full size.
That 2.15 becomes your HM number....
.185 HM: 1.2mm
.225 HM: 2.15mm
.350 HM: 5.33mm
.475 HM: 8.5mm
.600 HM: 11.68mm

So then we have
CN= O - HM
CN= -2.25-2.15
CN= -4.4


For the example wheel with an offset of -2.25 you get the following Comparison Number with various SLW hubs:
.185: -3.45mm
.225: -4.4mm
.350: -7.58
.475: -10.75
.600: -13.93



How to measure for an AO8 wheel
To figure out your offset, our formula one more time is:
Offset = B - (W/2)
B= Backspacing
W= Width

So we pull a backspace measurement like we do for all our AO8 style wheels:
Click the image to open in full size.

Call that measurement "B" and for example lets say B=12.15mm.

Now measure the entire width of the wheel (with the rings).
Call that "W" and for this example W=27mm.
That makes your formula look like this:
Offset = B - (W/2)
Offset = 13 - (27/2)
Offset = -.5

Now to get the Comparison Number we need:
CN= O + FM - WH
FM is Flange Measurement.
WH is Wheel Hex (that you are removing).

The AO8 285 flange has 2.85mm of meat between where your pin touches the flange and where the flange touches the wheel face:
Click the image to open in full size.
That 2.85 becomes you FM number:
285 FM= 2.85mm
485 FM= 4.85mm
685 FM= 6.85mm
885 FM= 8.85mm

Most narrow wheel hexes have 2.85mm of material between the pin and wheel face.
Most thicker one have about 4mm.
The 2mm or 4mm is your "WH" number.

Lets say you are going to a 285 FM and had a narrow wheel hex.

So:
CN= O - FM + WH
CN= -.5 - 2.85 + 2.5mm
CN= -.85
--------------

Now, let's put this to the test with an example...
You are moving from an 8L wheel to an AO8 with a 285 flange. You were also running a standard Axial wheel hex.

The 8L has a backspacing measurement of 13mm and width of 27mm.
Offset= B-(W/2)
Offset= 13 - (27/2)
Offset= -0.50mm
O= CN= -0.50mm


The AO8 has a backspacing of 13, a width of 27mm and you will use a 285 Flange.
Offset= B - (W/2)
Offset= 13 -(27/2)
Offset = -5
CN= O + FM - WH
CN= -.5 - 2.85 + 4mm
CN= .65

So we compare the -.5 (8L) to the .65 (AO8 ) and you have a +1.15mm change in the Comparison Number.
This means with the AO8 wheel setup your offset will change by +1.15mm, sucking your wheel in by 1.15mm compared to the 8L setup and the thick wheel hex.

--------------------------------------------------------------

If you look at the numbers you can really hurt your brain ... so one way we've made it easy for you is this:

1.9:
An AO8 with a 285 will give you the same stance as a stock SCX10, or one of our 8L wheels, or one of our SLW wheels with a .185 hub.

Click the image to open in full size.
In other words, we measure the stock SCX10 wheel (with our beadlock rings) to be 27mm wide with a backspace of 13mm, giving you an offset (and Comparison Number) of -0.50mm.

For every size up AO8 you get 2mm wider.
Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

2.2:
We measure a stock Wraith wheel to be 41mm wide, with a backspace of 26mm.
That makes the offset (and Comparison Number) a +5.5.

Our 2.2 SLW with a .185 and our 8L will both offer a similar stance to the Wraith wheel but because they are narrower you have less backspacing ... so more knuckle/link clearance.

Our 2.2 AO8 has width of 30.5 and backspacing of 18mm, for an offset of +2.75mm.
Assuming a 285 flange and that you removed a narrow wheel hex you get a Comparison Number of 2.65.

Click the image to open in full size.
As you can see, our A08 with a 285 has an offset that is 2.65mm less (pokes out more) than a Wraith wheel, our 8L and our SLW.

And again, for every size up AO8 you get 2mm wider.
Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

Click the image to open in full size.

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Where else can I find your products?

USA Distributors:
Florida

Illinois

Kentucky

Michagan

Oregon

Tennessee

Texas
Big Mike's Hobbies & Toys

Utah


Locked Up RC does limited shipping to international locations through our store.
If you are unable to checkout through the store, please contact us or one of our international distributors below.

International Distributors:
Australia:
onetencrawlers

Canada:
Xtreme RC

Worldwide:
Ebay
RPP Hobby


If you own a hobby store and would like to become a distributor, please contact us.


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Where can I find the store terms and conditions?

You can find our terms and conditions HERE .

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Where can I find product licensing info?

You can contact us for logo and licensing info.
For Trademark and Patent info, please click HERE.

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Do you sponsor events?

As of January 1, 2018 we will ONLY be sponsoring events that we attend.
So, your best bet to get your event sponsored is to get a hold of one of our Team Drivers and invite them to your event.


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How can I become a Team Driver?

About once a year we hold "The Next Team Driver" competition (AKA TNTD).
During this competition we put several contestants through a series of challenges and the public votes on a winner.
To get the latest on the contest, please visit our TNTD Forum and be sure to follow us on Facebook!